Friday, January 28, 2005

Sleet in a Claypot? - Mizore Nabe -


Mizore nabe

It was sooooooooo cold today. While I was riding my bicycle this afternoon, my mind was occupied with a fantasy of steaming hotpot dish…with tori dango (chicken meatballs). At first I was planning to have a regular nabe, but when I saw the leftover daikon at home, I decided to make it a “mizore-nabe.”

Mizore” means sleet, and mizore nabe is a nabe dish with grated daikon on top. Pretty healthy dish.

Ingredients

Recipe…..sorry, I didn’t measure anything. I just put Kombu (kelp) in water and heated it, added a little sake, soy sauce and mirin, then threw in the ingredients. My special chicken meatballs were lightly seasoned with salt, pepper, sake and soy sauce. I scooped the meat mixture with a spoon and dropped in boiling dashi.


When everyting was done, topped with grated daikon ( see the photo on top) and simmered some more. Oh, I browned the mochi (rice cakes…leftover again) in oven toaster beforehand.





Served with shichimi pepper and yuzu-ponzu.



Ahhhhh………. Hot and delicious...!!!



17 comments:

Anonymous said...

i love mizore nabe ... isn't that a great name! (I actually like calling them yuki-mi nabe, too). 

Posted by chika

Anonymous said...

That nabe looks so delicious!!! But, what is it???? Is that grated daikon on top???? What's "mizore"? Obachan, description and recipe please.............thank you...... 

Posted by lance

Anonymous said...

> chika --- yuki-mi nabe! Sounds poetic, doesn't it?

> lance --- Now you know what you wanted to know ; ) 

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

Thank you very much!!!! Looks so tasty and warming. Will have to try it. My aunty puts grated daikon and lemon juice in her fish soup at the very end and it adds a very nice flavor. Such a different flavor from cooking daikon pieces in the soup broth. She mentioned that if I wanted the broth on the hot (spicy) side to make a cut in the middle of the daikon and stick a chili pepper in the middle of the daikon and grate the daikon. Interesting, yeh? Must be the "old style". It seems like it would be harder to control the heat. Easier to just add some shichimi pepper at the end.  

Posted by lance

Anonymous said...

Dear Obachan,
Thank you for a most informative site about Japanese foods and I really enjoyed that article and Photos of the Japanese new year.

keona...Canada  

Posted by Anonymous

Anonymous said...

> lance --- The grated daikon with chili pepper is called “momiji oroshi,” I think. I heard some people used to, and still do make the momiji oroshi like your aunty said. Sounds like a good old-fashioned way.

> Keona --- Welcome and thanks for leaving such a kind comment :D I’m really flattered. Hope you come back often.
 

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

Hi Obachan! You have the cutest site! I think you are doing such a great job of teaching the world about Japanese food. Sometimes I forget that you are in Japan because you make everything seem so familiar and like home. I'm sure you know it, but your English is awesome!! I don't believe that you only spent 4 years living in the US... (^_~) -foodpocket 

Posted by foodpocket

Anonymous said...

Hi obachan,

That looks really good. In fact, it's a bit chilly tonight. I should have had something like this instead of the sobameshi that I had.  

Posted by Reid

Anonymous said...

Can I come over and have some, tooooo? 

Posted by Jonny Angel

Anonymous said...

Obachan: can I ask you a Japanese food question?

I often see "kashigata" cake molds for sale. But, I have never seen the actual cake that is made with these cake molds. Can you tell me or show me what these cakes look like, and what they are made from?

Thanks!
Jon 

Posted by Jonny Angel

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

> foodpocket --- Hi! Thanks for dropping by! I appreciate your kind comment soooooo much :D but my English isn’t that good…honestly.

> Reid --- Oh, sobameshi! I haven’t had that for a L-O-N-G time. I miss sobameshi….

> Jonny --- Sorry, it’s gone. But you can put some cooked rice in the leftover nabe soup and make ojiya ;)
About Kashigata…mmmm I’m not sure what kind of kashigata you’re talking about. What are they made of? Do they look like these?

 

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

Yes, that's it! 

Posted by Jonny Angel

Anonymous said...

Hey.. Obachan,
I was pretty sure.. i commented on this post .. earlier.. but i guess not.. :( memory failing me.. huh..???
Anyhow... love the food.. i would have it anyday.. ;) 

Posted by MrsT

Anonymous said...

> Jonny --- I guess the cakes you are talking about are what we call "rakugan" here. For more info. see this site and this site. (But I've never seen rakugan filled with chocolate cream or fruit jam!!!)

> MrsT --- This nabe was good. I wished you were here to eat with me :) 

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

I had my first yuki nabe last night. It was at Izakaya Riki's. (NYC, 45th and 3rd Ave). I asked the waitress to recommand something different and she suggested yuki nabe, which sounded intriguing. THey serve it with: broth, soft tofu, white cabbage, boiled bacon and boiled oysters, and of course, daikon snow on top + small dish of homemade ponzu on the side...Gorgeous...
Voila, c'est tout.
Yves

ghkj said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.