Thursday, February 17, 2005

Kasu-Jiru


Kasu-jiru (Sake-lees base soup)

This dish definitely warms you up on a cold winter day. The secret ingredient is sakekasu (sake lees) dissolved in the soup. It makes the soup really thick and gives rich flavor by adding subtle sourness(?). If you put too much, the alcohol in the sakekasu might make you sweat quite a bit.

You can put meat and vegetable of your choice, but root vegetables like daikon, carrot, taro and pork or fish are popular ingredients, I think. Konnyaku and aburage are also good in kasujiru. This time I put daikon (from my boss again. Thanks!), carrot, taro, shiitake, salmon and konnyaku in this tasty soup.


Salmon tasted soooo good in this soup!

Actually I’m not very good at making kasujiru. Good cooks seem to be able to season this soup without making it brown with soy sauce, but I always end up with pretty dirty-colored kasujiru even if I used light soy sauce. I heard the trick is using salt and a little miso effectively. Well, looks like I need a bit more practice.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

?? wats that..?? 

Posted by MrsT

Anonymous said...

oooooh looks delicious...good for curing what ails ya.:) .. Is that yuba???? Thanks for all your great ideas... I love home style Japanese cooking. 

Posted by keona

Anonymous said...

obachan, that looks so good! i always see sake lees at the store, but i didn't know how to use it. i'll try this!  

Posted by santos

Anonymous said...

> MrsT --- Hehe..now you know : )

> keona --- You mean that square thing? No, that’s not yuba. They’re pressed sakekasu (sake lees).

> santos --- You have sakekasu over there?! Wow! Try try!! : )
Sorry, I'm not good at making this kasu-jiru, so I couldn't post a recipe, but there seem to be some good kasujiru recipes on the net written in English. Hope you like this.  

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

obachan, I've not seen these before. Will keep a lookout for them the next time I go to a Jap supermarket. If sakekasu aren't available, can I just use sake?  

Posted by Julia

Anonymous said...

obachan, I've not seen these before. Will keep a lookout for them the next time I go to a Jap supermarket. If sakekasu aren't available, can I just use sake?  

Posted by Julia

Anonymous said...

Hi Julia,
So nice to know some people are interested in trying this soup : )
No, using sake isn't the same as using sakekasu at all. Of course adding a little sake generally makes soup tasty, but it doesn't give the special flavor that sakekasu does.  

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

Hey.. Obachan,
Do you still want the recipe for that chewy oatmeal chocolate chip cookie..??? my MIL gave me the right recipe tonite.. so if you want it .. let me know ok.. ;) 

Posted by MrsT

Anonymous said...

Hey MrsT,
Oh, how nice! Yes, yes! Can you email me at my address in my profile? No hurry, though --- anytime that’s convenient for you. Thanks! :D 

Posted by obachan

Anonymous said...

okie dokie.. Obachan.. ;)
I will do it tomorrow.. coz' i need to dig it outta my jeans.. and it's total darkness here.. coz' it's 3.38am here.. in Canada..;)
Chloe woke up.. and needed her milk... hah! 

Posted by MrsT

Anonymous said...

Obachan, I love kasu jiru. I owez thought kasu was for making amazake only, until I try this salty version. Yum Yum!! 

Posted by fish fish

Anonymous said...

> MrsT --- OMG, you’re up at 3.38am and reding my blog…! Thanks and hope you had a nice sleep after Chloe had her milk…

> fish fish --- Believe it or not, I’ve never tried making amazake myself yet. I’m going to try it sometime soon, because I still have plenty of sakekasu left. 

Posted by obachan

Kelley Tortorella said...

Good blog. Keep it running!